Downloading to or Printing a File from a PC Not in Carson

Windows 95/98/ME/2000/XP/Vista/7/8/10

MacOS

For MacOS, you can't use WinSCP or PSFTP, because they're only available for Windows.

Instead, do the following:

  1. Log in to ssh.ou.edu.

  2. Go to your CS1313 directory.

  3. At the Unix prompt, enter:

    mail youremailaddress@ou.edu < filename_you_want_to_transfer.txt

    replacing youremailaddress@ou.edu with your e-mail address and filename_you_want_to_transfer.txt with the name of the filename that you want to transfer to your MacOS Pc.

    (Note that the file you want to transfer could instead be a C source file such as my_number.c.)

    For example, if a student named Lee Kim with e-mail address of leekim@ou.edu wanted to transfer the script file for PP#1, then the command would be:

    mail leekim@ou.edu < pp1.txt

    [THIS IS JUST AN EXAMPLE.]

    If Lee Kim wanted to transfer my_number.c, then the command would be:

    mail leekim@ou.edu < my_number.c

  4. On the MacOS PC, open your preferred e-mail client software (for example, Microsoft Exchange, Gmail, Yahoo mail, whatever).

  5. Find that new e-mail and open it.

    Typically the sender will be just a 4 digit number, and the e-mail WON'T have a Subject line.

  6. Open up an appropriate text editor/word processor software application.

    For example, this MAY work with Microsoft Word, but that's NOT guaranteed.

  7. COPY-AND-PASTE the contents of the script file (or whatever) from the e-mail into that text/word application.

    DON'T COPY THE E-MAIL METADATA.

    For example, DON'T COPY the From or To lines.

  8. To save the file to your MacOS PC:

    After following the instructions listed, save the file to an appropriate folder.

    NOTE:

    You should save each file as something like "Plain text" or "Plain text document without line breaks or formatting."

    Also, a C source file such as my_number.c needs to have the .c extension, NOT .txt.

    If necessary, you could save a C source file as a .txt file and then rename that file to change the extension to .c.

  9. To print the file from your own printer (or wherever):

    1. Complete steps 1-7, above.

    2. Adjust the font, font size and margins as described in the PP#1 specification, page 15, items VIII.1.(i)-(n).

      Do this as best you can in the text/word application that you're using, but you'll need to use a 10 point, fixed width font such as Courier New, with 1 inch margins all around.

      ***DON'T*** USE A PROPORTIONAL WIDTH FONT (for example, Times New Roman, Calibri, Arial) — THESE ARE ***BAD BAD BAD*** for your source files and script files.

    3. Print the file on your own printer (or wherever), using your usual procedure for printing from that printer.

Unix/Linux

Unix/Linux will be the same as MacOS, above.